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Keezer condensation
  • BenvarineBenvarine
    Posts: 1,606
    What do you guys do to control or deal with the condensation in a Keezer. Only in use for a week or two now and lots of water in this thing.
  • ThymThym
    Posts: 103,769
    Try sealing it better, it shouldn't be condensing like that.
    The only thing between me and a train wreck is blind luck..... - Kenny
  • BenvarineBenvarine
    Posts: 1,606
    I'll give it a shot. The water is forming a few inches below the level of the top of the freezer. Obviously there are coils running around the sides at that level.
  • jlwjlw
    Posts: 16,417
    I get a lot of condensation in my kegerator. Always a puddle of water in the bottom. Just figured it was normal.
  • C_BC_B
    Posts: 77,634
    Condensation = moisture. I use picnic taps so i have to open the door to pull a pint, but if you have external taps you should be able to get it sealed up well enough to minimize condensation inside the cooler.
    "On it. I hate software." ~Cpt Snarklepants
  • BenvarineBenvarine
    Posts: 1,606
    Well it's a Keezer, so I have the door in contact with wood and wood in contact with the freezer, so lots of room for air leakage.
  • C_BC_B
    Posts: 77,634
    Benvarine said:

    Well it's a Keezer, so I have the door in contact with wood and wood in contact with the freezer, so lots of room for air leakage.


    There should be a way to tape/insulate the bulk of those leaks? Maybe not, what do I know.
    "On it. I hate software." ~Cpt Snarklepants
  • BenvarineBenvarine
    Posts: 1,606
    I used foam weather stripping, I am going to try caulk as well. It won't be pretty.
  • C_BC_B
    Posts: 77,634
    Benvarine said:

    I used foam weather stripping, I am going to try caulk as well. It won't be pretty.



    Maybe aluminum insulation tape for the joint at the bottom of the wood.
    "On it. I hate software." ~Cpt Snarklepants
  • BenvarineBenvarine
    Posts: 1,606
    I'm not familiar with that. Get at a regular hardware store?
  • C_BC_B
    Posts: 77,634
    Benvarine said:

    I'm not familiar with that. Get at a regular hardware store?


    Yep. It is used on panel insulation or around rough window openings before the window is installed. Lemme see if I can find a link for what I'm talking about.
    "On it. I hate software." ~Cpt Snarklepants
  • C_BC_B
    Posts: 77,634
    Also used on HVAC ducting. It isn't aluminum I'm sure, more like heavy foil on a four inch wide roll that is sticky as hell.
    "On it. I hate software." ~Cpt Snarklepants
  • C_BC_B
    Posts: 77,634
    "On it. I hate software." ~Cpt Snarklepants
  • scoobscoob
    Posts: 16,617
    Though our humidity levels are vastly different out here, I collect the big dessicant bags they pack in with metal car parts from the factory. I tear them open and fill a dollar store pitcher with the beads. I successfully use this to keep humidity in check in my fermentation fridge.

    I might look into trying something like that and see if it helps
    Jesus didn't wear pants
  • FuzzyFuzzy
    Posts: 46,885
    i use a towel. but i've been too lazy to deal with it so far, as i've been using that fridge to ripen cheeses and the extra moisture is a good thing.
    "Oh, you were serious? I was drunk."-C_B
  • frydogbrewsfrydogbrews
    Posts: 44,679
    this is not something that can be fixed by caulk or weatherstripping. this is directly related to the humidity we have here combined with a freezer being used as a fridge. the walls get very cold very fast and it condenses.

    you won't be able to stop this, but i have a fix!
    turn your controller down just a few degrees. the condensation will freeze on the wall, then once a month or so, peel the whole sheet off. done and done. mine is set at 35, verified with a separate thermometer inside, and it still freezes on the wall, because the wall is cooler.
  • C_BC_B
    Posts: 77,634
    Except that if you don't open the door, and all leaks are plugged for the most part there should be a reduced amount of moisture inside the keezer, eh?
    "On it. I hate software." ~Cpt Snarklepants
  • frydogbrewsfrydogbrews
    Posts: 44,679

    Except that if you don't open the door, and all leaks are plugged for the most part there should be a reduced amount of moisture inside the keezer, eh?


    if that were true, why does a fancy freezer have auto defrost? and for that matter, why does frost form inside a freezer anyway? its just frozen condensation.
    you can't seal it out, its dependent on ambient humidity. if scoob put his freezer outside, he wouldn't have any condensation at all. he also would have a broken freezer in a few days because of a burned out motor though.
  • C_BC_B
    Posts: 77,634
    That all makes sense, but a freezer frosting up depends on how often the door is opened. It will frost much faster if the door is opened more often. I agree there is going to be some condensation based on the humidity always, but air leaks will compound the problem.
    "On it. I hate software." ~Cpt Snarklepants
  • frydogbrewsfrydogbrews
    Posts: 44,679

    That all makes sense, but a freezer frosting up depends on how often the door is opened. It will frost much faster if the door is opened more often. I agree there is going to be some condensation based on the humidity always, but air leaks will compound the problem.



    agree on all points. but around here, the humidity gets so high during the summer, it really doesn't matter how often you open it.

    air conditioning helps alot though. mine sweat the most when we have the windows open, but still sweat a fair amount when the a/c is on.
    remember, i have a total of 5 freezers, this is a problem i deal with regularly
    especially since those freezers are in the basement where i cure meat, so i want it to be humid as hell down there.
  • Weather tape / foam stripping, and if you have wood extending the height, add a layer of foam board around the wood to help with temperature control.
  • BenvarineBenvarine
    Posts: 1,606
    I have the tape, I'll try the foam board. Thanks
  • scoobscoob
    Posts: 16,617
    I don't use a keezer, but my fermentation fridge is built much the same way, just oriented on its side, I have a medium sized dorm fridge with a 2x12 collar to extend the door out so I can ferment 20 gallons in carboys inside it, I used a thin bead of the low expanding rate great stuff foam to seal the wood to the fridge opening, secured it with a couple metal brackets and let it dry, if you cover the outside and inside visible edges with masking tape you can easily trim any excess foam with a razor knife when dry then peel the tape for a clean finish on the parts you see, the foam will create an airtight seal as well as act as an adhesive in addition to the brackets. I used metal angle iron to build the mating seal for the magnetic weatherstrip on my fridge door,I mitered the corners like a picture frame and used a combo of silicone sealant and countersunk screws to secure it.

    This has done a great job of sealing up my fermentation fridge and keeping condensation down to a minimum.
    Jesus didn't wear pants
  • ThymThym
    Posts: 103,769
    azscoob said:

    I don't use a keezer, but my fermentation fridge is built much the same way, just oriented on its side, I have a medium sized dorm fridge with a 2x12 collar to extend the door out so I can ferment 20 gallons in carboys inside it, I used a thin bead of the low expanding rate great stuff foam to seal the wood to the fridge opening, secured it with a couple metal brackets and let it dry, if you cover the outside and inside visible edges with masking tape you can easily trim any excess foam with a razor knife when dry then peel the tape for a clean finish on the parts you see, the foam will create an airtight seal as well as act as an adhesive in addition to the brackets. I used metal angle iron to build the mating seal for the magnetic weatherstrip on my fridge door,I mitered the corners like a picture frame and used a combo of silicone sealant and countersunk screws to secure it.

    This has done a great job of sealing up my fermentation fridge and keeping condensation down to a minimum.



    build thread?
    The only thing between me and a train wreck is blind luck..... - Kenny
  • scoobscoob
    Posts: 16,617
    Ok, let me charge the netbook So I can post up pics
    Jesus didn't wear pants
  • scoobscoob
    Posts: 16,617
    Might be a day or so, it's completely dead
    Jesus didn't wear pants