Do you soak your wood?
  • frydogbrewsfrydogbrews
    Posts: 44,679
    at 20 minutes, the wood is mostly gone
  • frydogbrewsfrydogbrews
    Posts: 44,679
    dry wood is dry wood. don't overthink it.

    the chunks from home depot, assuming they are not rotten, should work just as fine as the hickory i use
  • jlwjlw
    Posts: 16,449
    also soaking the wood overnight will help slow the burn down a little and produce more smoke
  • frydogbrewsfrydogbrews
    Posts: 44,679
    jlw said:

    also soaking the wood overnight will help slow the burn down a little and produce more smoke


    it will produce steam, not smoke.

    soaking wood is only good if your fire gets too hot and you need to cool it down. otherwise, the wood will just steam and steam for awhile before it will ever start smoking and burning.
  • C_BC_B
    Posts: 80,739

    jlw said:

    also soaking the wood overnight will help slow the burn down a little and produce more smoke


    it will produce steam, not smoke.

    soaking wood is only good if your fire gets too hot and you need to cool it down. otherwise, the wood will just steam and steam for awhile before it will ever start smoking and burning.

    And it also creates more smoke because the wood is smoldering instead of full on burning.
    "On it. I hate software." ~Cpt Snarklepants
  • ThymThym
    Posts: 109,728

    dry wood is dry wood. don't overthink it.

    the chunks from home depot, assuming they are not rotten, should work just as fine as the hickory i use



    the chunks have more surface area than split logs, therefore burn hotter and faster. plus it ass raping expensive. looks like a few places around me have oak and almond by the 1/4 cord. hoping to get something for less than $140.
    The only thing between me and a train wreck is blind luck..... - Kenny
  • ThymThym
    Posts: 109,728
    C_dubbs said:

    jlw said:

    also soaking the wood overnight will help slow the burn down a little and produce more smoke


    it will produce steam, not smoke.

    soaking wood is only good if your fire gets too hot and you need to cool it down. otherwise, the wood will just steam and steam for awhile before it will ever start smoking and burning.

    And it also creates more smoke because the wood is smoldering instead of full on burning.


    i dont soak my wood.
    The only thing between me and a train wreck is blind luck..... - Kenny
  • jlwjlw
    Posts: 16,449

    jlw said:

    also soaking the wood overnight will help slow the burn down a little and produce more smoke


    it will produce steam, not smoke.

    soaking wood is only good if your fire gets too hot and you need to cool it down. otherwise, the wood will just steam and steam for awhile before it will ever start smoking and burning.


    C_dubbs said:

    jlw said:

    also soaking the wood overnight will help slow the burn down a little and produce more smoke


    it will produce steam, not smoke.

    soaking wood is only good if your fire gets too hot and you need to cool it down. otherwise, the wood will just steam and steam for awhile before it will ever start smoking and burning.

    And it also creates more smoke because the wood is smoldering instead of full on burning.

    yes it helps prevent flare ups and also the chunks will not burnout quite as fast. Its a matter of preference. I usually use both soaked and dry. I tend to use the dry to get the heat up if needed and the wet to cool off or stop a flare up.
  • frydogbrewsfrydogbrews
    Posts: 44,679
    C_dubbs said:

    jlw said:

    also soaking the wood overnight will help slow the burn down a little and produce more smoke


    it will produce steam, not smoke.

    soaking wood is only good if your fire gets too hot and you need to cool it down. otherwise, the wood will just steam and steam for awhile before it will ever start smoking and burning.

    And it also creates more smoke because the wood is smoldering instead of full on burning.


    false false false

    as soon as it dries the wood and quit making steam, it burns up like anything else
  • frydogbrewsfrydogbrews
    Posts: 44,679
    jlw said:

    jlw said:

    also soaking the wood overnight will help slow the burn down a little and produce more smoke


    it will produce steam, not smoke.

    soaking wood is only good if your fire gets too hot and you need to cool it down. otherwise, the wood will just steam and steam for awhile before it will ever start smoking and burning.


    C_dubbs said:

    jlw said:

    also soaking the wood overnight will help slow the burn down a little and produce more smoke


    it will produce steam, not smoke.

    soaking wood is only good if your fire gets too hot and you need to cool it down. otherwise, the wood will just steam and steam for awhile before it will ever start smoking and burning.

    And it also creates more smoke because the wood is smoldering instead of full on burning.

    yes it helps prevent flare ups and also the chunks will not burnout quite as fast. Its a matter of preference. I usually use both soaked and dry. I tend to use the dry to get the heat up if needed and the wet to cool off or stop a flare up.


    this is the perfect approach!
  • ThymThym
    Posts: 109,728

    jlw said:

    jlw said:

    also soaking the wood overnight will help slow the burn down a little and produce more smoke


    it will produce steam, not smoke.

    soaking wood is only good if your fire gets too hot and you need to cool it down. otherwise, the wood will just steam and steam for awhile before it will ever start smoking and burning.


    C_dubbs said:

    jlw said:

    also soaking the wood overnight will help slow the burn down a little and produce more smoke


    it will produce steam, not smoke.

    soaking wood is only good if your fire gets too hot and you need to cool it down. otherwise, the wood will just steam and steam for awhile before it will ever start smoking and burning.

    And it also creates more smoke because the wood is smoldering instead of full on burning.

    yes it helps prevent flare ups and also the chunks will not burnout quite as fast. Its a matter of preference. I usually use both soaked and dry. I tend to use the dry to get the heat up if needed and the wet to cool off or stop a flare up.


    this is the perfect approach!


    but requires you to soak some wood, which you explicitly forbid.
    The only thing between me and a train wreck is blind luck..... - Kenny
  • frydogbrewsfrydogbrews
    Posts: 44,679
    Lakewood said:

    that seems pretty good. same price for cherry. i wonder if they would mix almond and cherry in the 1/4 cord...

    i'll still go over to home depot to get raped on wood chunks for the bigger flavor of hickory and mesquite.



    you end up with lots of tar and shit from fruit woods if you smoke purely with that.

    why not just use white oak? should be able to find that and its the most popular smoking wood in the world
  • C_BC_B
    Posts: 80,739

    C_dubbs said:

    jlw said:

    also soaking the wood overnight will help slow the burn down a little and produce more smoke


    it will produce steam, not smoke.

    soaking wood is only good if your fire gets too hot and you need to cool it down. otherwise, the wood will just steam and steam for awhile before it will ever start smoking and burning.

    And it also creates more smoke because the wood is smoldering instead of full on burning.


    false false false

    as soon as it dries the wood and quit making steam, it burns up like anything else

    Bah. What about wet leaves? Wet leaves smoke like a bitch. They may not even ever put off a flame, but they'll all turn to ash.
    "On it. I hate software." ~Cpt Snarklepants
  • ThymThym
    Posts: 109,728
    C_dubbs said:

    C_dubbs said:

    jlw said:

    also soaking the wood overnight will help slow the burn down a little and produce more smoke


    it will produce steam, not smoke.

    soaking wood is only good if your fire gets too hot and you need to cool it down. otherwise, the wood will just steam and steam for awhile before it will ever start smoking and burning.

    And it also creates more smoke because the wood is smoldering instead of full on burning.


    false false false

    as soon as it dries the wood and quit making steam, it burns up like anything else

    Bah. What about wet leaves? Wet leaves smoke like a bitch. They may not even ever put off a flame, but they'll all turn to ash.


    is it smoke or steam... or steamy smoke, or smokey steam?
    The only thing between me and a train wreck is blind luck..... - Kenny
  • C_BC_B
    Posts: 80,739
    Lakewood said:

    C_dubbs said:

    C_dubbs said:

    jlw said:

    also soaking the wood overnight will help slow the burn down a little and produce more smoke


    it will produce steam, not smoke.

    soaking wood is only good if your fire gets too hot and you need to cool it down. otherwise, the wood will just steam and steam for awhile before it will ever start smoking and burning.

    And it also creates more smoke because the wood is smoldering instead of full on burning.


    false false false

    as soon as it dries the wood and quit making steam, it burns up like anything else

    Bah. What about wet leaves? Wet leaves smoke like a bitch. They may not even ever put off a flame, but they'll all turn to ash.


    is it smoke or steam... or steamy smoke, or smokey steam?

    Some of both I'm sure.
    "On it. I hate software." ~Cpt Snarklepants
  • ThymThym
    Posts: 109,728
    C_dubbs said:

    Lakewood said:

    C_dubbs said:

    C_dubbs said:

    jlw said:

    also soaking the wood overnight will help slow the burn down a little and produce more smoke


    it will produce steam, not smoke.

    soaking wood is only good if your fire gets too hot and you need to cool it down. otherwise, the wood will just steam and steam for awhile before it will ever start smoking and burning.

    And it also creates more smoke because the wood is smoldering instead of full on burning.


    false false false

    as soon as it dries the wood and quit making steam, it burns up like anything else

    Bah. What about wet leaves? Wet leaves smoke like a bitch. They may not even ever put off a flame, but they'll all turn to ash.


    is it smoke or steam... or steamy smoke, or smokey steam?

    Some of both I'm sure.

    if you could remove the steam fraction from the smoke fraction, would there be more smoke than you get when burning the leave dry?
    The only thing between me and a train wreck is blind luck..... - Kenny
  • C_BC_B
    Posts: 80,739
    Lakewood said:

    C_dubbs said:

    Lakewood said:

    C_dubbs said:

    C_dubbs said:

    jlw said:

    also soaking the wood overnight will help slow the burn down a little and produce more smoke


    it will produce steam, not smoke.

    soaking wood is only good if your fire gets too hot and you need to cool it down. otherwise, the wood will just steam and steam for awhile before it will ever start smoking and burning.

    And it also creates more smoke because the wood is smoldering instead of full on burning.


    false false false

    as soon as it dries the wood and quit making steam, it burns up like anything else

    Bah. What about wet leaves? Wet leaves smoke like a bitch. They may not even ever put off a flame, but they'll all turn to ash.


    is it smoke or steam... or steamy smoke, or smokey steam?

    Some of both I'm sure.

    if you could remove the steam fraction from the smoke fraction, would there be more smoke than you get when burning the leave dry?

    My argument is yes. But I'm not going to try to prove it.
    "On it. I hate software." ~Cpt Snarklepants
  • ThymThym
    Posts: 109,728
    C_dubbs said:

    Lakewood said:

    C_dubbs said:

    Lakewood said:

    C_dubbs said:

    C_dubbs said:

    jlw said:

    also soaking the wood overnight will help slow the burn down a little and produce more smoke


    it will produce steam, not smoke.

    soaking wood is only good if your fire gets too hot and you need to cool it down. otherwise, the wood will just steam and steam for awhile before it will ever start smoking and burning.

    And it also creates more smoke because the wood is smoldering instead of full on burning.


    false false false

    as soon as it dries the wood and quit making steam, it burns up like anything else

    Bah. What about wet leaves? Wet leaves smoke like a bitch. They may not even ever put off a flame, but they'll all turn to ash.


    is it smoke or steam... or steamy smoke, or smokey steam?

    Some of both I'm sure.

    if you could remove the steam fraction from the smoke fraction, would there be more smoke than you get when burning the leave dry?

    My argument is yes. But I'm not going to try to prove it.


    that's not much of an argument. but WTF, i'll go with you on it.
    The only thing between me and a train wreck is blind luck..... - Kenny
  • C_BC_B
    Posts: 80,739
    Lakewood said:

    C_dubbs said:

    Lakewood said:

    C_dubbs said:

    Lakewood said:

    C_dubbs said:

    C_dubbs said:

    jlw said:

    also soaking the wood overnight will help slow the burn down a little and produce more smoke


    it will produce steam, not smoke.

    soaking wood is only good if your fire gets too hot and you need to cool it down. otherwise, the wood will just steam and steam for awhile before it will ever start smoking and burning.

    And it also creates more smoke because the wood is smoldering instead of full on burning.


    false false false

    as soon as it dries the wood and quit making steam, it burns up like anything else

    Bah. What about wet leaves? Wet leaves smoke like a bitch. They may not even ever put off a flame, but they'll all turn to ash.


    is it smoke or steam... or steamy smoke, or smokey steam?

    Some of both I'm sure.

    if you could remove the steam fraction from the smoke fraction, would there be more smoke than you get when burning the leave dry?

    My argument is yes. But I'm not going to try to prove it.


    that's not much of an argument. but WTF, i'll go with you on it.

    My theory here is the temperature of the fire. If you choke the fire down then temp drops and you get more smoke. Wet wood has the same effect. Cooler fires are more inefficient producing a heavier smoke. Whether smoke from a dampened fire is good for your meat is a different discussion.
    "On it. I hate software." ~Cpt Snarklepants
  • ThymThym
    Posts: 109,728
    C_dubbs said:

    Lakewood said:

    C_dubbs said:

    Lakewood said:

    C_dubbs said:

    Lakewood said:

    C_dubbs said:

    C_dubbs said:

    jlw said:

    also soaking the wood overnight will help slow the burn down a little and produce more smoke


    it will produce steam, not smoke.

    soaking wood is only good if your fire gets too hot and you need to cool it down. otherwise, the wood will just steam and steam for awhile before it will ever start smoking and burning.

    And it also creates more smoke because the wood is smoldering instead of full on burning.


    false false false

    as soon as it dries the wood and quit making steam, it burns up like anything else

    Bah. What about wet leaves? Wet leaves smoke like a bitch. They may not even ever put off a flame, but they'll all turn to ash.


    is it smoke or steam... or steamy smoke, or smokey steam?

    Some of both I'm sure.

    if you could remove the steam fraction from the smoke fraction, would there be more smoke than you get when burning the leave dry?

    My argument is yes. But I'm not going to try to prove it.


    that's not much of an argument. but WTF, i'll go with you on it.

    My theory here is the temperature of the fire. If you choke the fire down then temp drops and you get more smoke. Wet wood has the same effect. Cooler fires are more inefficient producing a heavier smoke. Whether smoke from a dampened fire is good for your meat is a different discussion.


    that relatively sound logic. it's likely true if the drying of the leaves is happening slowly and unevenly and is sucking away sufficient heat to keep the bulk of the fire below the open flame temp...
    The only thing between me and a train wreck is blind luck..... - Kenny
  • C_BC_B
    Posts: 80,739
    Lakewood said:

    C_dubbs said:

    Lakewood said:

    C_dubbs said:

    Lakewood said:

    C_dubbs said:

    Lakewood said:

    C_dubbs said:

    C_dubbs said:

    jlw said:

    also soaking the wood overnight will help slow the burn down a little and produce more smoke


    it will produce steam, not smoke.

    soaking wood is only good if your fire gets too hot and you need to cool it down. otherwise, the wood will just steam and steam for awhile before it will ever start smoking and burning.

    And it also creates more smoke because the wood is smoldering instead of full on burning.


    false false false

    as soon as it dries the wood and quit making steam, it burns up like anything else

    Bah. What about wet leaves? Wet leaves smoke like a bitch. They may not even ever put off a flame, but they'll all turn to ash.


    is it smoke or steam... or steamy smoke, or smokey steam?

    Some of both I'm sure.

    if you could remove the steam fraction from the smoke fraction, would there be more smoke than you get when burning the leave dry?

    My argument is yes. But I'm not going to try to prove it.


    that's not much of an argument. but WTF, i'll go with you on it.

    My theory here is the temperature of the fire. If you choke the fire down then temp drops and you get more smoke. Wet wood has the same effect. Cooler fires are more inefficient producing a heavier smoke. Whether smoke from a dampened fire is good for your meat is a different discussion.


    that relatively sound logic. it's likely true if the drying of the leaves is happening slowly and unevenly and is sucking away sufficient heat to keep the bulk of the fire below the open flame temp...


    I like that you put "relatively" in the middle of "that's sound logic".
    "On it. I hate software." ~Cpt Snarklepants
  • ThymThym
    Posts: 109,728
    C_dubbs said:

    Lakewood said:

    C_dubbs said:

    Lakewood said:

    C_dubbs said:

    Lakewood said:

    C_dubbs said:

    Lakewood said:

    C_dubbs said:

    C_dubbs said:

    jlw said:

    also soaking the wood overnight will help slow the burn down a little and produce more smoke


    it will produce steam, not smoke.

    soaking wood is only good if your fire gets too hot and you need to cool it down. otherwise, the wood will just steam and steam for awhile before it will ever start smoking and burning.

    And it also creates more smoke because the wood is smoldering instead of full on burning.


    false false false

    as soon as it dries the wood and quit making steam, it burns up like anything else

    Bah. What about wet leaves? Wet leaves smoke like a bitch. They may not even ever put off a flame, but they'll all turn to ash.


    is it smoke or steam... or steamy smoke, or smokey steam?

    Some of both I'm sure.

    if you could remove the steam fraction from the smoke fraction, would there be more smoke than you get when burning the leave dry?

    My argument is yes. But I'm not going to try to prove it.


    that's not much of an argument. but WTF, i'll go with you on it.

    My theory here is the temperature of the fire. If you choke the fire down then temp drops and you get more smoke. Wet wood has the same effect. Cooler fires are more inefficient producing a heavier smoke. Whether smoke from a dampened fire is good for your meat is a different discussion.


    that relatively sound logic. it's likely true if the drying of the leaves is happening slowly and unevenly and is sucking away sufficient heat to keep the bulk of the fire below the open flame temp...


    I like that you put "relatively" in the middle of "that's sound logic".


    :))
    The only thing between me and a train wreck is blind luck..... - Kenny
  • frydogbrewsfrydogbrews
    Posts: 44,679
    C_dubbs said:

    Lakewood said:

    C_dubbs said:

    Lakewood said:

    C_dubbs said:

    C_dubbs said:

    jlw said:

    also soaking the wood overnight will help slow the burn down a little and produce more smoke


    it will produce steam, not smoke.

    soaking wood is only good if your fire gets too hot and you need to cool it down. otherwise, the wood will just steam and steam for awhile before it will ever start smoking and burning.

    And it also creates more smoke because the wood is smoldering instead of full on burning.


    false false false

    as soon as it dries the wood and quit making steam, it burns up like anything else

    Bah. What about wet leaves? Wet leaves smoke like a bitch. They may not even ever put off a flame, but they'll all turn to ash.


    is it smoke or steam... or steamy smoke, or smokey steam?

    Some of both I'm sure.

    if you could remove the steam fraction from the smoke fraction, would there be more smoke than you get when burning the leave dry?

    My argument is yes. But I'm not going to try to prove it.


    your argument is wrong.
  • ThymThym
    Posts: 109,728

    C_dubbs said:

    Lakewood said:

    C_dubbs said:

    Lakewood said:

    C_dubbs said:

    C_dubbs said:

    jlw said:

    also soaking the wood overnight will help slow the burn down a little and produce more smoke


    it will produce steam, not smoke.

    soaking wood is only good if your fire gets too hot and you need to cool it down. otherwise, the wood will just steam and steam for awhile before it will ever start smoking and burning.

    And it also creates more smoke because the wood is smoldering instead of full on burning.


    false false false

    as soon as it dries the wood and quit making steam, it burns up like anything else

    Bah. What about wet leaves? Wet leaves smoke like a bitch. They may not even ever put off a flame, but they'll all turn to ash.


    is it smoke or steam... or steamy smoke, or smokey steam?

    Some of both I'm sure.

    if you could remove the steam fraction from the smoke fraction, would there be more smoke than you get when burning the leave dry?

    My argument is yes. But I'm not going to try to prove it.


    your argument is wrong.


    Ha ha, classic! This whole convo is sooo getting split to the open area.
    The only thing between me and a train wreck is blind luck..... - Kenny
  • C_BC_B
    Posts: 80,739

    C_dubbs said:

    Lakewood said:

    C_dubbs said:

    Lakewood said:

    C_dubbs said:

    C_dubbs said:

    jlw said:

    also soaking the wood overnight will help slow the burn down a little and produce more smoke


    it will produce steam, not smoke.

    soaking wood is only good if your fire gets too hot and you need to cool it down. otherwise, the wood will just steam and steam for awhile before it will ever start smoking and burning.

    And it also creates more smoke because the wood is smoldering instead of full on burning.


    false false false

    as soon as it dries the wood and quit making steam, it burns up like anything else

    Bah. What about wet leaves? Wet leaves smoke like a bitch. They may not even ever put off a flame, but they'll all turn to ash.


    is it smoke or steam... or steamy smoke, or smokey steam?

    Some of both I'm sure.

    if you could remove the steam fraction from the smoke fraction, would there be more smoke than you get when burning the leave dry?

    My argument is yes. But I'm not going to try to prove it.


    your argument is wrong.

    Prove it.
    "On it. I hate software." ~Cpt Snarklepants