Do you soak your wood?
  • frydogbrewsfrydogbrews
    Posts: 44,679
    C_dubbs said:

    C_dubbs said:

    Lakewood said:

    C_dubbs said:

    Lakewood said:

    C_dubbs said:

    C_dubbs said:

    jlw said:

    also soaking the wood overnight will help slow the burn down a little and produce more smoke


    it will produce steam, not smoke.

    soaking wood is only good if your fire gets too hot and you need to cool it down. otherwise, the wood will just steam and steam for awhile before it will ever start smoking and burning.

    And it also creates more smoke because the wood is smoldering instead of full on burning.


    false false false

    as soon as it dries the wood and quit making steam, it burns up like anything else

    Bah. What about wet leaves? Wet leaves smoke like a bitch. They may not even ever put off a flame, but they'll all turn to ash.


    is it smoke or steam... or steamy smoke, or smokey steam?

    Some of both I'm sure.

    if you could remove the steam fraction from the smoke fraction, would there be more smoke than you get when burning the leave dry?

    My argument is yes. But I'm not going to try to prove it.


    your argument is wrong.

    Prove it.


    do you have a few years.....


    but ok, here you go.
    combustion needs to be efficient to produce clean smoke. if something isn't dry, it produces craploads way more tar. imagine smoking green tobacco or uncured "other smokables", loaded with junk and you'll need to throw away the outer layer as it will be soaked in gros ass creosote, but let's not even deal with that......

    you have a sidecar smoker, even if your fire is hot, the smoke will form inside the smoker chamber. if you burn lots of soaked wood, you are introducing water into the smoking atmosphere. you have probably heard of the word "pellicle" in reference to smoking meats, it is the dry, tacky layer that forms on the outer layer of meat that is ready to smoke. most meats need a rest after coming out of the brine, uncovered in the fridge, for 24 hours to properly form this pellicle. you can tell when its formed, its slightly iridescent.
    anyway, this sticky layer absorbs smoke. if you add in wet meat without the pellicle, the heat from the smoker will need to dry the meat before any smoke will be absorbed. you introduce steam from wet wood into this, and you have injecting your smoker with "anti smoke" that will stop your meat from absorbing smoke.

    like jlw said though, wet wood is really good for emergency regulation, but it should not be viewed as a method of "creating" more smoke any more than banging your head on a wall is great way to get a high.

    highly suggested reading material for your perusal before you come back here to play:
    http://www.amazon.com/Meat-Smoking-And-Smokehouse-Design/dp/0982426704/ref=cm_lmf_tit_1

    http://www.amazon.com/Home-Production-Quality-Meats-Sausages/dp/0982426739/ref=cm_lmf_tit_3

    http://www.amazon.com/The-Quick-Easy-Smoking-Food/dp/0832904627/ref=cm_lmf_tit_4

    http://www.amazon.com/Smoke-Spice-Cooking-Real-Barbecue/dp/1558322620/ref=cm_lmf_tit_9
  • C_BC_B
    Posts: 80,746


    combustion needs to be efficient to produce clean smoke. if something isn't dry, it produces craploads way more tar. imagine smoking green tobacco or uncured "other smokables", loaded with junk and you'll need to throw away the outer layer as it will be soaked in gros ass creosote, but let's not even deal with that......


    Ayup. The original argument here was whether or not wet wood produced more smoke. To which you said,


    it will produce steam, not smoke.


    I argued that it will, in fact, create more smoke. To which you said,


    false false false


    So does it create craploads of tar and gross ass creosote or just steam?

    And about the quality of the smoke...
    C_dubbs said:


    My theory here is the temperature of the fire. If you choke the fire down then temp drops and you get more smoke. Wet wood has the same effect. Cooler fires are more inefficient producing a heavier smoke. Whether smoke from a dampened fire is good for your meat is a different discussion.


    So yeah, you said it more completely and with references, but this ^^ right here ^^ was the first mention of smoke quality.
    "On it. I hate software." ~Cpt Snarklepants
  • ThymThym
    Posts: 109,752

    C_dubbs said:

    C_dubbs said:

    Lakewood said:

    C_dubbs said:

    Lakewood said:

    C_dubbs said:

    C_dubbs said:

    jlw said:

    also soaking the wood overnight will help slow the burn down a little and produce more smoke


    it will produce steam, not smoke.

    soaking wood is only good if your fire gets too hot and you need to cool it down. otherwise, the wood will just steam and steam for awhile before it will ever start smoking and burning.

    And it also creates more smoke because the wood is smoldering instead of full on burning.


    false false false

    as soon as it dries the wood and quit making steam, it burns up like anything else

    Bah. What about wet leaves? Wet leaves smoke like a bitch. They may not even ever put off a flame, but they'll all turn to ash.


    is it smoke or steam... or steamy smoke, or smokey steam?

    Some of both I'm sure.

    if you could remove the steam fraction from the smoke fraction, would there be more smoke than you get when burning the leave dry?

    My argument is yes. But I'm not going to try to prove it.


    your argument is wrong.

    Prove it.


    do you have a few years.....


    but ok, here you go.
    combustion needs to be efficient to produce clean smoke. if something isn't dry, it produces craploads way more tar. imagine smoking green tobacco or uncured "other smokables", loaded with junk and you'll need to throw away the outer layer as it will be soaked in gros ass creosote, but let's not even deal with that......

    you have a sidecar smoker, even if your fire is hot, the smoke will form inside the smoker chamber. if you burn lots of soaked wood, you are introducing water into the smoking atmosphere. you have probably heard of the word "pellicle" in reference to smoking meats, it is the dry, tacky layer that forms on the outer layer of meat that is ready to smoke. most meats need a rest after coming out of the brine, uncovered in the fridge, for 24 hours to properly form this pellicle. you can tell when its formed, its slightly iridescent.
    anyway, this sticky layer absorbs smoke. if you add in wet meat without the pellicle, the heat from the smoker will need to dry the meat before any smoke will be absorbed. you introduce steam from wet wood into this, and you have injecting your smoker with "anti smoke" that will stop your meat from absorbing smoke.

    like jlw said though, wet wood is really good for emergency regulation, but it should not be viewed as a method of "creating" more smoke any more than banging your head on a wall is great way to get a high.

    highly suggested reading material for your perusal before you come back here to play:
    http://www.amazon.com/Meat-Smoking-And-Smokehouse-Design/dp/0982426704/ref=cm_lmf_tit_1

    http://www.amazon.com/Home-Production-Quality-Meats-Sausages/dp/0982426739/ref=cm_lmf_tit_3

    http://www.amazon.com/The-Quick-Easy-Smoking-Food/dp/0832904627/ref=cm_lmf_tit_4

    http://www.amazon.com/Smoke-Spice-Cooking-Real-Barbecue/dp/1558322620/ref=cm_lmf_tit_9


    I think you're both right here. I would think that there probably is 'more' smoke, but that the smoke is total crap. The food would not benifit from the tarry mess you would create.
    The only thing between me and a train wreck is blind luck..... - Kenny
  • C_BC_B
    Posts: 80,746
    Lakewood said:

    C_dubbs said:

    C_dubbs said:

    Lakewood said:

    C_dubbs said:

    Lakewood said:

    C_dubbs said:

    C_dubbs said:

    jlw said:

    also soaking the wood overnight will help slow the burn down a little and produce more smoke


    it will produce steam, not smoke.

    soaking wood is only good if your fire gets too hot and you need to cool it down. otherwise, the wood will just steam and steam for awhile before it will ever start smoking and burning.

    And it also creates more smoke because the wood is smoldering instead of full on burning.


    false false false

    as soon as it dries the wood and quit making steam, it burns up like anything else

    Bah. What about wet leaves? Wet leaves smoke like a bitch. They may not even ever put off a flame, but they'll all turn to ash.


    is it smoke or steam... or steamy smoke, or smokey steam?

    Some of both I'm sure.

    if you could remove the steam fraction from the smoke fraction, would there be more smoke than you get when burning the leave dry?

    My argument is yes. But I'm not going to try to prove it.


    your argument is wrong.

    Prove it.


    do you have a few years.....


    but ok, here you go.
    combustion needs to be efficient to produce clean smoke. if something isn't dry, it produces craploads way more tar. imagine smoking green tobacco or uncured "other smokables", loaded with junk and you'll need to throw away the outer layer as it will be soaked in gros ass creosote, but let's not even deal with that......

    you have a sidecar smoker, even if your fire is hot, the smoke will form inside the smoker chamber. if you burn lots of soaked wood, you are introducing water into the smoking atmosphere. you have probably heard of the word "pellicle" in reference to smoking meats, it is the dry, tacky layer that forms on the outer layer of meat that is ready to smoke. most meats need a rest after coming out of the brine, uncovered in the fridge, for 24 hours to properly form this pellicle. you can tell when its formed, its slightly iridescent.
    anyway, this sticky layer absorbs smoke. if you add in wet meat without the pellicle, the heat from the smoker will need to dry the meat before any smoke will be absorbed. you introduce steam from wet wood into this, and you have injecting your smoker with "anti smoke" that will stop your meat from absorbing smoke.

    like jlw said though, wet wood is really good for emergency regulation, but it should not be viewed as a method of "creating" more smoke any more than banging your head on a wall is great way to get a high.

    highly suggested reading material for your perusal before you come back here to play:
    http://www.amazon.com/Meat-Smoking-And-Smokehouse-Design/dp/0982426704/ref=cm_lmf_tit_1

    http://www.amazon.com/Home-Production-Quality-Meats-Sausages/dp/0982426739/ref=cm_lmf_tit_3

    http://www.amazon.com/The-Quick-Easy-Smoking-Food/dp/0832904627/ref=cm_lmf_tit_4

    http://www.amazon.com/Smoke-Spice-Cooking-Real-Barbecue/dp/1558322620/ref=cm_lmf_tit_9


    I think you're both right here. I would think that there probably is 'more' smoke, but that the smoke is total crap. The food would not benifit from the tarry mess you would create.

    Agreed. Does this mean with both get a trophy?
    "On it. I hate software." ~Cpt Snarklepants
  • frydogbrewsfrydogbrews
    Posts: 44,679
    Lakewood said:

    C_dubbs said:

    C_dubbs said:

    Lakewood said:

    C_dubbs said:

    Lakewood said:

    C_dubbs said:

    C_dubbs said:

    jlw said:

    also soaking the wood overnight will help slow the burn down a little and produce more smoke


    it will produce steam, not smoke.

    soaking wood is only good if your fire gets too hot and you need to cool it down. otherwise, the wood will just steam and steam for awhile before it will ever start smoking and burning.

    And it also creates more smoke because the wood is smoldering instead of full on burning.


    false false false

    as soon as it dries the wood and quit making steam, it burns up like anything else

    Bah. What about wet leaves? Wet leaves smoke like a bitch. They may not even ever put off a flame, but they'll all turn to ash.


    is it smoke or steam... or steamy smoke, or smokey steam?

    Some of both I'm sure.

    if you could remove the steam fraction from the smoke fraction, would there be more smoke than you get when burning the leave dry?

    My argument is yes. But I'm not going to try to prove it.


    your argument is wrong.

    Prove it.


    do you have a few years.....


    but ok, here you go.
    combustion needs to be efficient to produce clean smoke. if something isn't dry, it produces craploads way more tar. imagine smoking green tobacco or uncured "other smokables", loaded with junk and you'll need to throw away the outer layer as it will be soaked in gros ass creosote, but let's not even deal with that......

    you have a sidecar smoker, even if your fire is hot, the smoke will form inside the smoker chamber. if you burn lots of soaked wood, you are introducing water into the smoking atmosphere. you have probably heard of the word "pellicle" in reference to smoking meats, it is the dry, tacky layer that forms on the outer layer of meat that is ready to smoke. most meats need a rest after coming out of the brine, uncovered in the fridge, for 24 hours to properly form this pellicle. you can tell when its formed, its slightly iridescent.
    anyway, this sticky layer absorbs smoke. if you add in wet meat without the pellicle, the heat from the smoker will need to dry the meat before any smoke will be absorbed. you introduce steam from wet wood into this, and you have injecting your smoker with "anti smoke" that will stop your meat from absorbing smoke.

    like jlw said though, wet wood is really good for emergency regulation, but it should not be viewed as a method of "creating" more smoke any more than banging your head on a wall is great way to get a high.

    highly suggested reading material for your perusal before you come back here to play:
    http://www.amazon.com/Meat-Smoking-And-Smokehouse-Design/dp/0982426704/ref=cm_lmf_tit_1

    http://www.amazon.com/Home-Production-Quality-Meats-Sausages/dp/0982426739/ref=cm_lmf_tit_3

    http://www.amazon.com/The-Quick-Easy-Smoking-Food/dp/0832904627/ref=cm_lmf_tit_4

    http://www.amazon.com/Smoke-Spice-Cooking-Real-Barbecue/dp/1558322620/ref=cm_lmf_tit_9


    I think you're both right here. I would think that there probably is 'more' smoke, but that the smoke is total crap. The food would not benifit from the tarry mess you would create.


    depends entirely on your definition of "smoke" i think. i don't consider 70% water vapor to be smoke, but what do i know......i only smoke about 300 lbs of meat a year......
  • frydogbrewsfrydogbrews
    Posts: 44,679
    50 lbs of which is bacon, so i get the trophy!
  • C_BC_B
    Posts: 80,746

    50 lbs of which is bacon, so i get the trophy!


    Oh yeah. That's worth a couple trophies.
    "On it. I hate software." ~Cpt Snarklepants
  • C_BC_B
    Posts: 80,746

    Lakewood said:

    C_dubbs said:

    C_dubbs said:

    Lakewood said:

    C_dubbs said:

    Lakewood said:

    C_dubbs said:

    C_dubbs said:

    jlw said:

    also soaking the wood overnight will help slow the burn down a little and produce more smoke


    it will produce steam, not smoke.

    soaking wood is only good if your fire gets too hot and you need to cool it down. otherwise, the wood will just steam and steam for awhile before it will ever start smoking and burning.

    And it also creates more smoke because the wood is smoldering instead of full on burning.


    false false false

    as soon as it dries the wood and quit making steam, it burns up like anything else

    Bah. What about wet leaves? Wet leaves smoke like a bitch. They may not even ever put off a flame, but they'll all turn to ash.


    is it smoke or steam... or steamy smoke, or smokey steam?

    Some of both I'm sure.

    if you could remove the steam fraction from the smoke fraction, would there be more smoke than you get when burning the leave dry?

    My argument is yes. But I'm not going to try to prove it.


    your argument is wrong.

    Prove it.


    do you have a few years.....


    but ok, here you go.
    combustion needs to be efficient to produce clean smoke. if something isn't dry, it produces craploads way more tar. imagine smoking green tobacco or uncured "other smokables", loaded with junk and you'll need to throw away the outer layer as it will be soaked in gros ass creosote, but let's not even deal with that......

    you have a sidecar smoker, even if your fire is hot, the smoke will form inside the smoker chamber. if you burn lots of soaked wood, you are introducing water into the smoking atmosphere. you have probably heard of the word "pellicle" in reference to smoking meats, it is the dry, tacky layer that forms on the outer layer of meat that is ready to smoke. most meats need a rest after coming out of the brine, uncovered in the fridge, for 24 hours to properly form this pellicle. you can tell when its formed, its slightly iridescent.
    anyway, this sticky layer absorbs smoke. if you add in wet meat without the pellicle, the heat from the smoker will need to dry the meat before any smoke will be absorbed. you introduce steam from wet wood into this, and you have injecting your smoker with "anti smoke" that will stop your meat from absorbing smoke.

    like jlw said though, wet wood is really good for emergency regulation, but it should not be viewed as a method of "creating" more smoke any more than banging your head on a wall is great way to get a high.

    highly suggested reading material for your perusal before you come back here to play:
    http://www.amazon.com/Meat-Smoking-And-Smokehouse-Design/dp/0982426704/ref=cm_lmf_tit_1

    http://www.amazon.com/Home-Production-Quality-Meats-Sausages/dp/0982426739/ref=cm_lmf_tit_3

    http://www.amazon.com/The-Quick-Easy-Smoking-Food/dp/0832904627/ref=cm_lmf_tit_4

    http://www.amazon.com/Smoke-Spice-Cooking-Real-Barbecue/dp/1558322620/ref=cm_lmf_tit_9


    I think you're both right here. I would think that there probably is 'more' smoke, but that the smoke is total crap. The food would not benifit from the tarry mess you would create.


    depends entirely on your definition of "smoke" i think. i don't consider 70% water vapor to be smoke, but what do i know......i only smoke about 300 lbs of meat a year......

    70%? Did you measure that with your water vapor to smoke concentration meter? (WVSCM, for short)
    "On it. I hate software." ~Cpt Snarklepants
  • frydogbrewsfrydogbrews
    Posts: 44,679
    as a matter of fact i did. embezzled from work. handy.
  • J_ReeJ_Ree
    Posts: 80,393
    I'm going to side 100% with Fry on this. I've soaked my wood before, but that was only to keep temps in check in less than ideal situations; and it was never quite right.
    CB's to do list:
    Your mom
  • ceanntceannt
    Posts: 51,938
    I use a cylinder smoker ..... I put hickory chunks on to soak right before I get my two chimney lighters going with charcoal. Never had any problems
    Never attribute to malice, that which can adequately be explained by stupidity.
  • ceanntceannt
    Posts: 51,938
    And around here .... hickory is free ....
    Never attribute to malice, that which can adequately be explained by stupidity.
  • frydogbrewsfrydogbrews
    Posts: 44,679
    ceannt said:

    And around here .... hickory is free ....



    yup
  • scoobscoob
    Posts: 16,617
    I have used both soaked and dry wood chunks, lately I have been just using dry logs, with the intake vent closed enough, it burns slow enough I can control temps pretty well, when I started using my smoker I used soaked chunks but too often I had really low temps after adding the wood.
    Jesus didn't wear pants
  • scoobscoob
    Posts: 16,617
    ceannt said:

    And around here .... hickory is free ....



    I'm stuck with loads of mesquite and pecan, mesquite is everywhere, and there are vast groves of pecan trees that get trimmed, cut down, etc. I just hit up Craig's list and find someone giving it away.
    Jesus didn't wear pants
  • ThymThym
    Posts: 109,752
    azscoob said:

    ceannt said:

    And around here .... hickory is free ....



    I'm stuck with loads of mesquite and pecan, mesquite is everywhere, and there are vast groves of pecan trees that get trimmed, cut down, etc. I just hit up Craig's list and find someone giving it away.


    i can find eucalyptus for free... but no thanks.
    The only thing between me and a train wreck is blind luck..... - Kenny
  • ceanntceannt
    Posts: 51,938
    Lakewood said:

    azscoob said:

    ceannt said:

    And around here .... hickory is free ....



    I'm stuck with loads of mesquite and pecan, mesquite is everywhere, and there are vast groves of pecan trees that get trimmed, cut down, etc. I just hit up Craig's list and find someone giving it away.


    i can find eucalyptus for free... but no thanks.


    Its awesome wood though .... I miss it .... but I agree on smoking with it ..... eewww
    Never attribute to malice, that which can adequately be explained by stupidity.