Garden Winterization
  • jlwjlw
    Posts: 16,449
    Finally got the garden done for the winter. I mulch leaves and then till into the soil and let it sit until Feb when it's time to start getting ready for the growing season. This year I am thinking about planting rye and then I would till into the soil in the spring. Not completely sold on the idea yet. The other thing I plan on doing is throwing down some 10-10-10 fertilizer.

    What are your garden/yard winterizing chores and tips? Thought maybe this could be an open random thread on winter chores for the yard/garden. I guess except lake since he never really has winter.
  • BenvarineBenvarine
    Posts: 1,606
    I'm sure @frydogbrews will chime in. Especially in regards to the leaves, I think he is opposed, but he can answer.

    I always recommend a soil test before applying any fertilizer and I would recommend any application wait until spring, otherwise you will surely lose some by erosion, weed usage, etc.

    I don't do anything to my garden but cut it down. I compost the stuff I pull or cut out and leave it alone. I do all my prep in the spring. If you leave your residue in the garden by simply hacking down, then I might recommend tilling in to help it break down.

    If you have a garden that may erode away during the winter, I recommend a cover crop of wheat. You can simply till it in come spring. Wheat is cheap too. About $10-12/50 lb bag. You can also just cover with straw, that's even cheaper and you can also till in spring.

    Back to fertilizer,if you are using an organic form of fertilizer, which I do, I apply in the spring. I basically just apply organic matter and till in. I also have applied a few organic supplements that cover a broad range of plants, but basically I'm adding nitrogen in a slow release form.
  • ThymThym
    Posts: 109,243
    For winterization I guess I'll put the ladder back in the garage.
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    The only thing between me and a train wreck is blind luck..... - Kenny
  • frydogbrewsfrydogbrews
    Posts: 44,679
    yeah, what benvarine said, mostly.

    my beds that are not in use still (full of carrots and beets) i will put organic matter like horse manure on and till in, but that is way before now, like back in mid october, so some stuff starts growing right away and holding soil in. generally tilling this time of year just ends up having lots of soil blow away during winter winds and when you live in an area where "dirt" is scarce, you can't allow any to blow away.
  • C_BC_B
    Posts: 80,551
    Lakewood said:

    For winterization I guess I'll put the ladder back in the garage.


    How come the most techy guy on the forum (and the nerd behind it's inception) can't post a damn picture in the correct orientation?
    "On it. I hate software." ~Cpt Snarklepants
  • C_BC_B
    Posts: 80,551
    I mowed mine down after everything was done and tilled it up once. If I get around to it I'm going to put a couple bucket loads (skidsteer bucket) of manure on it. Just enough to avoid wind erosion and add a bit of nitrogen. I've always liked the cover crop idea, but I never get around to it.
    "On it. I hate software." ~Cpt Snarklepants
  • ThymThym
    Posts: 109,243
    C_dubbs said:

    Lakewood said:

    For winterization I guess I'll put the ladder back in the garage.


    How come the most techy guy on the forum (and the nerd behind it's inception) can't post a damn picture in the correct orientation?


    Took the picture with my phone. And blackberry's are retarded.
    The only thing between me and a train wreck is blind luck..... - Kenny
  • jlwjlw
    Posts: 16,449
    Well, we don't get much wind here so I don;t think there is much wind erosion to worry about. I still have a lot of leaves to clean up so maybe I will use those to cover up the garden.
  • ThymThym
    Posts: 109,243
    I use leaves to add organics into my clay. Works really well.
    The only thing between me and a train wreck is blind luck..... - Kenny
  • frydogbrewsfrydogbrews
    Posts: 44,679
    Lakewood said:

    I use leaves to add organics into my clay. Works really well.



    best thing in the world to break down clay is pine needles. it takes a long time, but it totally converts it.
  • ThymThym
    Posts: 109,243

    Lakewood said:

    I use leaves to add organics into my clay. Works really well.



    best thing in the world to break down clay is pine needles. it takes a long time, but it totally converts it.


    I usually dump the pine needles from the christmas tree. But that's all I have for pine.
    The only thing between me and a train wreck is blind luck..... - Kenny
  • scoobscoob
    Posts: 16,617
    My soil out here is crazy, this was all farmland, hit or miss on the dirt quality after the houses were built, I got lucky, I can drop a seed in the dirt and pow! It grows like mad...

    I turn the old dead clippings from the prior crops into the soil, sort of a rotating constant mulching.

    There is no down time out here so I have to keep the garden rolling, right now Swiss chard and beets are rocking, the pepper plants are done, pulled and tossed in the bin for later mulching into the dirt, different than many other folks on here for their garden I know but it works for me!
    Jesus didn't wear pants
  • ceanntceannt
    Posts: 51,493
    I top dress with compost made from last years maple leaves and everything "green" from the summer .... weeds... vegetable scraps etc..... I turn it in come spring
    Never attribute to malice, that which can adequately be explained by stupidity.